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XU Dezhen
Type of contribution: poster

First determination of the locations of the Chinese Deep Space Stations -- JIAMUS66 and KASHI35 using Geodetic VLBI

Dezhen XU, Beijing Institute of Tracking and Telecommunications Technology Huan ZHOU, Beijing Institute of Tracking and Telecommunications Technology Guangliang DONG, Beijing Institute of Tracking and Telecommunications Technology Haitao LI, Beijing Institute of Tracking and Telecommunications Technology Guangli WANG, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory Fengchun SHU, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory

Accurate spacecraft navigation especially deep space navigation using radio metric measurements requires good knowledge of the locations of the ground stations. As a request of the Chinese Deep Space Exploration Missions in the coming future, the station locations of the two Chinese Deep Space Stations JIAMUS66 and KASHI35 (both put to use in late 2012), which are located in northeast and northwest China respectively, should be determined with high accuracy and tied into the international terrestrial reference frame (ITRF). Since both of the two stations have the ability of VLBI measurements, a 24-hour S/X dual-band geodetic VLBI experiment was conducted on Sep. 28, 2014, with the participation of the four Chinese VLBI telescopes (SESHAN25, URUMQI, BEIJING and KUMING). However, for this experiment, the data were recorded in the band 2200~2300 MHz (through 4 channels) and 8400~8500 MHz (also through 4 channels) at JIAMUS66 and KASHI35, which is a limitation of the VLBI backend available at the two Chinese Deep Space Stations. For the four Chinese VLBI telescopes with much wider-frequency range (300 MHz at S-band and 500~800 MHz at X-band), 2 more channels at S-band and 4 more channels at X-band were setup. More than 3000 delay observations were obtained at both S-band and X-band, and analysis of the observations yields good results in terms of formal errors. The locations of JIAMUS66 and KASHI35 are measured to a precision about 1 cm in the local north and east direction, and 3~5 cm in the local up direction, which validates the effectiveness of the design, data processing, and analysis of the experiment.