Yebes Observatory 40-m Telescope
CALL FOR PROPOSALS
The Yebes Observatory calls for participation in open-time observations for the first half of 2019 (February 1st - July 31st, 2019).
Proposal submission: from November 12th (0h, CET) to December 9th (23h59m, CET), 2018.
Available instrumentation: C-band (6.6 GHz), K-band (21-25 GHz), and Q-band (41-49 GHz). Observations in K- and Q-bands can be performed simultaneously covering an instantaneous bandwidth of 9 GHz in Q band and 2.5 GHz in K band with 38 kHz of spectral resolution. C-band observations are limited to an instantaneous bandwidth of 500 or 100 MHz (30 or 6.1 kHz of spectral resolution) centered in 6.6 GHz.
As part of the technical developments pushed by the ERC-Nanocosmos project (ERC-2013-Syg-610256-NANOCOSMOS), we plan to expand up to 18 GHz the instantaneous bandwidth in Q band. We expect that this improvement will be available since February 1st 2019.
Note.- Only spectral observations. Continuum observations are only available for pointing and focus.
The staff of the Yebes Observatory and the OAN will be able to assist in the elaboration of the proposals and realization of the observations, according to each individual case.
Further details – Proposal submission.
by C. Albo
by C. Albo
by C. Albo
by C. Albo
by J.R. Pardo
by J.R. Pardo
by M. Santander
by M. Santander
by P. de Vicente
by P. de Vicente
by P. de Vicente
by P. de Vicente
The Yebes Observatory 40m radiotelescope
The Yebes 40m radiotelescope is located in Yebes Observatory (Yebes area, Guadalajara, Spain) at an altitude of about 1000 m. This is one of the facilities developed by the Spanish National Geographic Institute (IGN, Ministerio de Fomento).
The telescope is a Nasmyth-Cassegrain single dish antenna of 40 m. The instrument is equipped with receivers in bands from 2 to 100 GHz, and appropiate backends (Fast Fourier Transform Spectrometers for spectral line observations). The precipitable water vapour level is less than 6 mm and reaches a minimum of 2 mm in the winter.
The 40-m radio telescope runs since 2008 as a member of the networks of Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) studies for astronomy (EVN, GMVA, RadioAstron) and geodesy (IVS).
Recently, the telescope has been optimized to operate as a single-dish facility for astronomical observations of cosmic sources. These observations allow the study of colder regions of our galaxy such as star forming regions and circumstellar envelopes, through measuring the emission of molecular gas and dust, and of environments affected by the stellar radiation (HII regions) through the observation of Hydrogen and Helium radio recombination lines. The operating wavelengths of the telescope complement those of the most sensitive single-dish telescopes such as the IRAM 30m and APEX and the most powerful interferometers ALMA, NOEMA, and SKA.